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Publication Type
Journal Article
UWI Author(s)
Author, Analytic
Rapley, John
Author Affiliation, Ana.
Department of Government
Article Title
From revolution to reform: Jamaica at the turn of the century
Medium Designator
n/a
Connective Phrase
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Journal Title
Black Renaissance/Renaissance Noire
Translated Title
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Reprint Status
n/a
Date of Publication
1999
Volume ID
2
Issue ID
2
Page(s)
82-93
Language
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Connective Phrase
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Location/URL
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ISSN
n/a
Notes
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Abstract
Two events in 1998, University of the West Indies' conference on Jamaica in the 70s and the student-led rebellion that toppled the Suharto regime in Indonesia, provide the backdrop for an inquiry into why, despite years of economic decline, deteriorating security and public retrenchment in the face of deepening hardship, there has been no revolution in Jamaica. Suggests that the conference may have been a watershed. By picking over the bones of the decade when Jamaica was seething with revolutionary fervour, some of Jamaica’s leading scholars were able to close a chapter without forgetting its most important lessons. A new chapter, whose agenda has been given some broad outlines, lies ready to be written. It is progressive and reformist rather than revolutionary, seeking consensus over conflict. These seem to be among the principles of a new paradigm that has been emerging in Jamaica’s intellectual discourse. Jamaica is not alone in its search for a new vision. As the neoliberal revolution exhausts itself, there is a pressing need for new ideas that can tackle the challenges of globalization while constructing a more just global society. Predicts a difficult and eventful political season in Jamaica for the economic and security situation is likely to deteriorate further. But this will probably push the political regime into a crisis, making major changes unavoidable....
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