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Publication Type
Book Whole
UWI Author(s)
Author Affiliation, Ana.
Department of History and Archaeology
Author, Monographic
Gosse, Dave St A.
Author Role
n/a
Title, Monographic
The impact of the Haitian revolution on the emancipation of slavery in Jamaica
Translated Title
n/a
Reprint Status
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Edition
n/a
Author, Subsidiary
n/a
Author Role
n/a
Place of Publication
Kingston, Jamaica
Publisher Name
Emancipation Commemoration Committee
Date of Publication
2004
Original Pub Date
n/a
Volume ID
n/a
Extent of Work
17p
Packaging Method
n/a
Series Editor
n/a
Series Editor Role
n/a
Series Title
Churches emancipation lecture 2004
Series Volume ID
n/a
Location/URL
n/a
ISBN
n/a
Notes
n/a
Abstract
Argues that the un-warranted paranoia among many of the Jamaican planters to the Haitian revolution, indirectly, contributed to further socio-economic and political decay in early 19th century Jamaican slave society. The planters' hysteria and repression towards their enslaved Africans were racially motivated and resulted in their vigorous resistance and sabotage of amelioration that was being recommended by the metropolitan authorities. The Jamaican planters were fearful of its implications. Given the economic context, such planter resistance to amelioration was counter-productive to efficient plantation management. Secondly, this paper refutes Eric Williams' argument that racism was a result of the economic forces existent in British West Indian slave society. The author shows that both racism and economics operated simultaneously from the very beginning of British West Indian slave society. Thus, racial and economic motives were not in opposition to each other but were mutual partners.....
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