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Publication Type
Book Chapter
UWI Author(s)
Author, Analytic
Benkeblia, Noureddine; Shiomi, Norio
Author Affiliation, Ana.
n/a
Title, Analytic
Postharvest metabolism of carbohydrates in onion bulb
Medium Designator
n/a
Connective Phrase
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Author, Monographic
Benkeblia, Noureddine; Shiomi, Norio
Author Role
Editors
Title, Monographic
Advances in postharvest technology for horticultural crops
Reprint Status
Refereed
Edition
n/a
Place of Publication
[S.I.]
Publisher Name
Research Signpost
Date of Publication
2006
Volume ID
n/a
Issue ID
n/a
Page(s)
351-373
Series Editor
n/a
Series Editor Role
n/a
Series Title
n/a
Series Volume Identification
n/a
Series Issue Identification
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Connective Phrase
n/a
Location/URL
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Notes
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Abstract
Fructooligosaccharides (FOS), as other nondigestibles oligo- and polysaccharides (NDO, NDP) are present in a wide range of higher plants. The physicochemical and biological properties of these compounds, as they relate to dietary fiber, are associated with their physiological actions. These properties include water dispersibility and solubility, viscosity effects, bulk, absorption and fermentability, and binding of other compounds. These features may lead to various physiological roles. Moreover, based on their physiochemical properties, many of these oligosaccharides can help improve the technological, quality attributes and nutritional value of horticultural crops. In the past two decades, there has been vast expansion in the research of fructooligosaccharides (FOS) of higher plants, including their chemistry, biochemistry and enzymology. However, in spite of these considerable advances in fructan science, many other aspects of the mechanisms of fructan metabolism have not been fully understood. The bulbing, yield and keepability (storage) of dry onion cultivars vary, but they depend on the contents of the high dry matter and non-structural carbohydrates (fructooligosaccharides) which contribute to long-term storability. Knowledge of the mechanisms of the degradation of the FOS that occurs during storage is of great interest. Important progress has been made in the research area of onion FOS, and in addition to their role as accessible reserve carbohydrates in bulbs during sprouting, FOS have been found to participate in many physiological processes of production, protection and preservation of the bulbs. This review aims to elucidate our understanding of FOS metabolism in onion bulbs during the postharvest life, based on recent investigations. The activities of the main enzymes involved in the synthesis and the hydrolysis of the FOS during the postharvest (storage) life of the bulbs are reviewed, although present knowledge is too limited to explain clearly the mechanisms triggering the enzymes activities or the mechanisms by which FOS contribute to quality and long keepability of the bulbs.....
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