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Publication Type
Journal Article
UWI Author(s)
Author, Analytic
Persaud,Chandarika; Forrester, Terrence E.; Jackson, Alan A.
Author Affiliation, Ana.
Tropical Metabolism Research Unit
Article Title
Urinary excretion of 5-L-oxoproline (pyroglutamic acid) is increased during recovery from severe childhood malnutrition and responds to supplemental glycine
Medium Designator
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Connective Phrase
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Journal Title
Journal of Nutrition
Translated Title
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Reprint Status
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Date of Publication
1996
Volume ID
126
Issue ID
11
Page(s)
2823-2830
Language
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Connective Phrase
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Location/URL
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ISSN
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Notes
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Abstract
Hypothesizes that a limitation in the endogenous formation of glycine might constrain catch-up growth during recovery from severe childhood malnutrition. The urinary excretion of 5-L-oxoproline is increased when the glycine available for glutathione synthesis is limited. Measures urinary excretion of 5-L-oxoproline throughout recovery in 12 children (aged 16 +/- 6 mo) with severe malnutrition. Urinary 5-L-oxoproline was similar at admission and after recovery, but was increased significantly during rapid catch-up growth. There was a significant relationship between the rate of weight gain and 5-L- oxoproline excretion in urine. In nine children (aged 15 +/- 5 mo), the effect of oral supplementation with glycine, [1.7 mmol/(kg x d) for 48 h] during rapid catch-up growth on 5-L-oxoprolinuria and blood glutathione concentration was determined. In seven of the nine children weight gain was less than 17 g/(kg x d) and following oral glycine supplements 5-L-oxoproline excretion was reduced up to 64% and blood glutathione concentration increased up to 100%. In the two children who were gaining weight at a rate > 17 g/(kg x d), glycine supplementation was associated with a further increase in 5-L-oxoproline excretion and a decrease in blood glutathione. If 5-L-oxoproline is an index of the relative availability of glycine, then the data indicate that glycine may be limiting during rapid catch-up growth. This would have important implications for repletion of muscle and gain in height....
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