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Publication Type
Journal Article
UWI Author(s)
Author, Analytic
Walker, Susan P.; Rimm, E.B.; Ascherio, A.; Kawachi, I.; Stampfer, M.J.; Willett, W.C.
Author Affiliation, Ana.
Tropical Metabolism Research Unit
Article Title
Body size and fat distribution as predictors of stroke among US men
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Journal Title
American Journal of Epidemiology
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Reprint Status
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Date of Publication
1996
Volume ID
144
Issue ID
12
Page(s)
1143-1150
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ISSN
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Notes
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Abstract
Looks at how closely abdominal obesity may be related to stroke risk. The association of body mass index and abdominal obesity (waist/hip ratio) with stroke incidence was examined in 28,643 US male health professionals, aged 40-75 years in 1986, who had no history of cardiovascular disease or stroke. In 5 years of follow-up, there were 118 cases of stroke, of which 80 were ischemic. Compared with men in the lowest quintile of body mass index, men in the highest quintile had an age-adjusted relative risk of stroke of 1.29 (95% confidence interval 0.73-2.27). In contrast, the age-adjusted relative risk for extreme quintiles of waist/hip ratio was 2.33 (95% confidence interval 1.25-4.37). This relative risk was not substantially altered in a multivariate model including body mass index, height, and other potential risk factors. There was a weaker relation with waist circumference alone, with men in the highest quintile (> 40.2 inches) having a relative risk of 1.52 (95% confidence interval 0.82-2.82) compared with men in the lowest quintile (< or = 34.5 inches) (1 inch = 2.54 cm). The results suggest that abdominal obesity, but not elevated body mass index, predicts risk of stroke in men....
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