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Publication Type
Journal Article
UWI Author(s)
Author, Analytic
Godfrey, K. M.; Forrester, Terrence E.; Barker, D. J.; Jackson, Alan A.; Landman Bogues, Jacqueline P.; Hall, Joseph St. E.; Cox, V.; Osmond, C.
Author Affiliation, Ana.
Tropical Metabolism Research Unit
Article Title
Maternal nutritional status in pregnancy and blood pressure in childhood
Medium Designator
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Connective Phrase
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Journal Title
British Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology
Translated Title
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Reprint Status
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Date of Publication
1994
Volume ID
101
Issue ID
5
Page(s)
398-403
Language
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Connective Phrase
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Location/URL
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ISSN
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Notes
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Abstract
Examines the relation between indices of maternal nutrition during pregnancy, including haemoglobin concentration, skinfold thickness and body weight, and the child's blood pressure at 10 to 12 years of age, as a follow up study of children whose mothers had haemoglobin estimations, weights and skinflod thickness recorded during pregnancy. Examines seventy-seven children whose mothers took part in a prospective study of nutrition during pregnancy in relation to fetal growth in Kingston, Jamaica. The child's mean systolic pressure adjusted for current weight rose by 2.6 mmHg (95 percent CI 0.5-4.6, P = 0.01) for each 1 g/dl fall in the mothers's lowest haemoglobin suring pergnancy. Mothers with a lower haemoglobin had thinner skinfold thickness, especially over the triceps (P=0.005). In multiple regression analyses, taking account of the child's sex and current weight, there was a strong association between thin maternal triceps skinfold thickness at 15 weeks of gestation and raised blood pressure in the offspring. Taking account of the mother's tricep skinfold thickness abolished the relation between lower haemoglobin and raised blood pressure in the child. Lower weight gain between 15 and 35 weeks of gestation was independently associated with raised children's blood pressure. Systolic pressure rose by 10.7 mmHg (95 percent CI 5.7 to 15.6, P= 0.0001) for each log mm decrease in the mother's triceps skinfold thickness, and by 0.6 mmHg (95 percent CI 0.1 to 1.0, P = 0.02) for each 1 kg decrease in the mother's weight gain during pregnancy. These results parallel animal experiments suggesting that impaired maternal nutrition may underlie the programming of adult hypertension during fetal life.....
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