View
Publication Type
Journal Article
UWI Author(s)
Author, Analytic
Lambert, M. C.; Samms-Vaughan, Maureen E.; Lyubansky, M. ; Rose, D.; Grandison, T. ; Holness, A.; Hannah, S. D.; Podolski, C. L.; Rowan, G. T. ; Durst, J.
Author Affiliation, Ana.
Department of Obstetrics, Gynaecology and Child Health
Article Title
Emotions and psychopathology
Medium Designator
n/a
Connective Phrase
n/a
Journal Title
West Indian Medical Journal
Translated Title
n/a
Reprint Status
Refereed
Date of Publication
1999
Volume ID
48
Issue ID
4
Page(s)
203-07
Language
eng
Connective Phrase
n/a
Location/URL
n/a
ISSN
0043-3144
Notes
n/a
Abstract
Few psychological assessment instruments exist for Jamaicans. Studies that address the appropriateness of foreign instruments for Jamaicans are sparse and empirical focus on psychopathology and its aetiology in Jamaican adults is virtually nonexistent. The present study addressed these deficits via Confirmatory Factor Analyses (CFA) which revealed that factors on the Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS-20) and Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI) were not replicated for a Jamaican sample (N = 352). Exploratory Factor Analyses (EFA) on the TAS-20 revealed one factor labelled Unawareness and Confusion Regarding Emotions (UCRE). Also, EFA yielded six BSI dimensions labelled Somatic Complaints, Paranoia, Hostility, Mild Depression/Dysthymia, Major Depression with Psychotic Features, and Agoraphobia with Panic. Regression analyses on the Jamaican-based TAS-20 and BSI factors revealed a positive relationship between UCRE and each BSI factor and total BSI score. Mild Depression, Agoraphobia with Panic, Paranoia, Hostility, Mild Depression and Major Depression were higher for women and younger Jamaicans, respectively, but younger Jamaicans with higher UCRE scores had higher scores on Paranoia, Major Depression, and total score. The findings suggest that Jamaican mental health policy and programmes should focus on the difficulties some Jamaicans experience in recognising and expressing their emotions.....
read more