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Publication Type
Journal Article
UWI Author(s)
Author, Analytic
Simeon, Donald T.; LeFranc, Elsie R-M.; Bain, Brendan C. ; Wyatt, Gail E.
Author Affiliation, Ana.
Department of Community Health and Psychiatry
Article Title
Experiences and socialization of Jamaican men with multiple sex partners
Medium Designator
n/a
Connective Phrase
n/a
Journal Title
West Indian Medical Journal
Translated Title
n/a
Reprint Status
Refereed
Date of Publication
1999
Volume ID
48
Issue ID
4
Page(s)
212-15
Language
eng
Connective Phrase
n/a
Location/URL
n/a
ISSN
0043-3144
Notes
n/a
Abstract
One of the goals of the Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) control programme in Jamaica is to encourage persons to have a single sex partner. Before this can be achieved in men, it is important to identify the demographic characteristics as well as the sexual attitudes and socialization of men who have multiple sex partners. A national survey was conducted on sexual decision-making in Jamaica in which a random sample of 3,001 persons was selected for study and of 2,580 (86%) interviewed 979 were men. The following analyses included the 769 men who were sexually active. Thirty-four per cent (34%), 95% CI, 30.6-37.4%) of these men said that they were currently having sex with more than one woman. Although condom use was higher in men with multiple sex partners, 33% of them said that they never used condoms. Independent predictors of having multiple sex partners were: not being in a stable union; being raised by fathers only; and having a secondary school education. There was no significant association with church attendance or with occupation. Compared with other males, men who had multiple sex partners started having sex at an earlier age and were more likely to engage in high-risk sex behaviours such as having sex with prostitutes and abusing drugs prior to coitus. They were also more likely to believe in the use of sex as a means to control their partners and were less likely to think that being married or involved in a long-term relationship was important. These data must be taken into consideration by the AIDS control programme in Jamaica when formulating policies to promote monogamy. There may also be a need to implement parenting support or education programmes for single men who raise their sons.....
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