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Publication Type
Journal Article
Author, Analytic
Jackson, Maria D.; Walker, Susan P.; Cade, J.; Forrester, Terrence E.; Cruickshank, J. Kennedy; Wilks, Rainford J.
Author Affiliation, Ana.
Department of Community Health and Psychiatry
Article Title
Reproducibility and validity of a quantitative food frequency questionnaire among Jamaicans of African origin
Medium Designator
n/a
Connective Phrase
n/a
Journal Title
Public Health Nutrition
Translated Title
n/a
Reprint Status
Refereed
Date of Publication
2001
Volume ID
4
Issue ID
5
Page(s)
971-80
Language
eng
Connective Phrase
n/a
Location/URL
n/a
ISSN
1368-9800
Notes
n/a
Abstract
An interviewer-administered quantitative food-frequency questionnaire (FFQ) was developed to determine the energy and nutrient intakes of adult Jamaicans of African origin as part of a study of the epidemiology of diabetes and hypertension. Reproducibility of the questionnaire was investigated in 123 participants aged 25-74 years. The relative validity of the FFQ was assessed against twelve 24- hour recalls administered over 12 months in 73 of the participants. In addition, energy intakes (EI) were compared with estimated basal metabolic rates (BMR). Reproducibility correlation coefficients (Pearson and intraclass) varied between 0.42 for retinol and 0.71 for carbohydrate, with most values falling between 0.50 and 0.60. When compared with repeated 24-hour recalls, the FFQ estimated slightly higher energy (mean 6%) and macronutrient intakes (mean 2- 14%), and was within 5% when expressed as a percentage of energy intake. Micronutrients were higher by 1.19 (calcium) to 1.61 times (vitamin C). Unadjusted correlations between the FFQ and the reference method ranged from 0.20 for beta-carotene to 0.86 for alcohol. Cross- classification of nutrients into quartiles showed that 46-48% of participants in the lowest and highest quartiles were jointly classified by both methods. Misclassifications were low for most nutrients with one or two persons misclassified at the extreme quartiles. EI/BMR ratios suggested light to moderate activity levels appropriate for an urban population in a developing country. The FFQ showed reasonable reproducibility and validity and is suitable for estimating the habitual intakes of energy and macronutrients, but was poor for some micronutrients (retinol and beta- carotene).....
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