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Publication Type
Journal Article
UWI Author(s)
Author, Analytic
Hutton, Dave G.
Author Affiliation, Ana.
Agriculture Unit
Article Title
Efficacy of household disinfectants or pimento leaf residue to manage nematode infestation in soil
Medium Designator
n/a
Connective Phrase
n/a
Journal Title
Bulletin of the Jamaican Society for Agricultural Sciences
Translated Title
n/a
Reprint Status
Refereed
Date of Publication
2001
Volume ID
13
Issue ID
n/a
Page(s)
40-44
Language
n/a
Connective Phrase
n/a
Location/URL
n/a
ISSN
n/a
Notes
n/a
Abstract
It is crucial that scientists find alternative materials and strategies to pesticide, as these become more unavailable to agriculturalists worldwide. In Jamaica, the nematicidal effectiveness of crop residues, certain organic amendments or household disinfectants is being investigated. Soil naturally infested with Meloidogyne incognita and Rotylenchulus reniformis was drenched with 1000 ppm bleach (NaOCl), 0.25% Jeyes Fluid (a blend of high-boiling tar acids and washed neutral oil, solubilized in vegetable soap), or 1000 ppm Dettol antiseptic (chloroxylenol) solutions, or amended with shreded, dried pimento (Pimenta dioica) leaf (1% w/w). After three weeks, the pots were planted with cucumber (Cucumis sativus), tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) or red bean (Phaseolus vulgaris). Nematode populations were measured before soil treatment, at planting and 50 days after, when M. incognita galling on roots was measured and plant dry weights were taken. In all treatments, including the 500 ppm nematicide oxamyl used for comparison, R. reniformis populations decreased between treatment and planting, and except for oxamyl, increased beyond pre-treatment levels by harvest when the highest population were noticed in the control treatment. M. incognita numbers were higher in the bleach treatment at planting than at the outset, but not detected at harvest. In the control treatment, the root-knot nematode numbers decreased after three weeks and increased, but not to initial levels, by harvest. In other treatments, M. incognita remained low, sometimes undetected, at planting and at harvest. There were significant levels of root galling of control plants for all three crops and on tomato and cucumber from the bleach treatment. There was no noticeable difference in red pea or tomato plant weight between the treatment, but for cucumber dry weights in the control, oxamyl and pimento leaf treatments were significantly higher than in the bleach, Dettol and Jeyes treatments. The disinfectants and oxamyl treatments seemed to be injurious to one crop or the other.....
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