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Publication Type
Journal Article
Author, Analytic
Powell, Christine A.; Walker, Susan P.; Chang, Susan M.; Grantham-McGregor, Sally M.
Author Affiliation, Ana.
Tropical Medicine Research Institute
Article Title
Nutrition and education: A randomized trial of the effects of breakfast in rural primary school children
Medium Designator
n/a
Connective Phrase
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Journal Title
American Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Translated Title
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Reprint Status
Refereed
Date of Publication
1998
Volume ID
68
Issue ID
4
Page(s)
873-9
Language
eng
Connective Phrase
n/a
Location/URL
n/a
ISSN
n/a
Notes
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Abstract
Presents results of a randomized, controlled trial of giving breakfast to undernourished and adequately nourished children. The undernourished group comprised 407 children in grades 2-5 in 16 rural Jamaican schools (weights-for-age < or = -1 SD of the National Center for Health Statistics references) and the adequately nourished group comprised 407 children matched for school and class (weights-for-age >-1 SD). Both groups were stratified by class and school, then randomly assigned to breakfast or control groups. After the initial measurements, breakfast was provided every school day for 1 school year. Children in the control group were given one-quarter of an orange and the same amount of attention as children in the breakfast group. All children had their heights and weights measured and were given the Wide Range Achievement Test before and after the intervention. School attendance was taken from the schools' registers. Compared with the control group, height, weight, and attendance improved significantly in the breakfast group. Both groups made poor progress in Wide Range Achievement Test scores. Younger children in the breakfast group improved in arithmetic. There was no effect of nutritional group on the response to breakfast. In conclusion, the provision of a school breakfast produced small benefits in children's nutritional status, school attendance, and achievement. Greater improvements may occur in more undernourished populations; however, the massive problem of poor achievement levels requires integrated programs including health and educational inputs as well as school meals.....
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