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Publication Type
Journal Article
Author, Analytic
Mbanya, J. C.; Cruickshank, J. Kennedy; Forrester, Terrence E.; Balkau, B.; Ngogang, J. Y.; Riste, Lisa K.; Forhan, A. ; Anderson, N. M.; Bennett, Franklyn I.; Wilks, Rainford J.
Author Affiliation, Ana.
Tropical Medicine Research Institute
Article Title
Standardized comparison of glucose intolerance in west African-origin populations of rural and urban Cameroon, Jamaica, and Caribbean migrants to Britain
Medium Designator
n/a
Connective Phrase
n/a
Journal Title
Diabetes Care
Translated Title
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Reprint Status
n/a
Date of Publication
1999
Volume ID
22
Issue ID
3
Page(s)
434-40
Language
eng
Connective Phrase
n/a
Location/URL
n/a
ISSN
0149-5992
Notes
n/a
Abstract
Compares the prevalence of glucose intolerance in genetically similar African-origin populations within Cameroon and from Jamaica and Britain. Subjects studied were from rural and urban Cameroon or from Jamaica, or were Caribbean migrants, mainly Jamaican, living in Manchester, England. Sampling bases included a local census of adults aged 25-74 years in Cameroon, districts statistically representative in Jamaica, and population registers in Manchester. African-Caribbean ethnicity required three grandparents of this ethnicity. Diabetes was defined by the World Health Organization (WHO) 1985 criteria using a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test (2-h > or = 11.1 mmol/l or hypoglycemic treatment) and by the new American Diabetes Association criteria (fasting glucose > or = 7.0 mmol/l or hypoglycemic treatment). RESULTS: For men, mean BMIs were greatest in urban Cameroon and Manchester (25-27 kg/m2); in women, these were similarly high in urban Cameroon and Jamaica and highest in Manchester (27-28 kg/m2). The age-standardized diabetes prevalence using WHO criteria was 0.8% in rural Cameroon, 2.0% in urban Cameroon, 8.5% in Jamaica, and 14.6% in Manchester, with no difference between sexes (men: 1.1%, 1.0%, 6.5%, 15.3%, women: 0.5%, 2.8%, 10.6%, 14.0%), all tests for trend P < 0.001. Impaired glucose tolerance was more frequent in Jamaica. The transition in glucose intolerance from Cameroon to Jamaica and Britain suggests that environment determines diabetes prevalence in these populations of similar genetic origin.....
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