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Publication Type
Book Chapter
Author, Analytic
Robinson, Dwight E.; Snow, J. Wendell; Grant, George
Author Affiliation, Ana.
Department of Life Sciences
Title, Analytic
The use of the sterile insect technique to eradicate the screwworm fly, Cochliomyia hoinivorax, from Jamaica
Medium Designator
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Author, Monographic
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Title, Monographic
Utilization of natural products in Developing Countries: Trends and needs edited by Ajai Mansingh, Ajai, Donald E Young, Donald E. , Trevor H.Yee, Rupija Delgoda, Dwight E. Robinson,Dwight E., Errol Y. Morrison, Henry I.Lowe.
Reprint Status
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Edition
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Place of Publication
Kingston, Jamaica
Publisher Name
The Natural Products Institute, University of the West Indies
Date of Publication
2002
Volume ID
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Issue ID
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Page(s)
227-30
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Notes
Also published in Abstracts. International Symposium. Utilization of Natural Products in Developing Countries: Trends and needs p. 41.
Abstract
The screwworm fly, Cochliomyia hoinivorax, a pest of warm-blooded animals. results in annual losses of US $5.5 to US $7 M in Jamaica. In July 1998, Jamaica, in collaboration with the International Atomic Energy Agency and the United States Department of Agriculture launched a programme to eradicate the fly from the island by July 2001 using the sterile flies and chilled fly techniques. In August 1999, when the island-wide release of 15 million sterile flies each week began, there were 319 cases of screwworm infestation reported across the island. This number declined steadily to 150 in April 2000. Favourable conditions for the reproduction and survival of the screwworm fly during May resulted in a sharp increase in the number of reported cases. For the month of July, 369 cases of screwworm infestation were reported, the highest since the starrt of the programme. An increase in the number of sterile flies released each week to 25 million had the desired effect with the number of reported cases falling steadily to 200 in December 2000.....
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