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Publication Type
Journal Article
Author, Analytic
Craven, Michael P.; Newman, Somara M.; Fletcher, Maurice; Silvera, Brian C.; Coore, Daniel N.; Forbes, Neil F.; Ramphal, Paul S.
Author Affiliation, Ana.
Department of Mathematics and Computer Science
Article Title
Cardiac training simulator using pump with electronic pressure sensor to trigger ventricular fibrillation
Medium Designator
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Connective Phrase
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Journal Title
Proceedings of IEEE SoutheastCon
Translated Title
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Reprint Status
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Date of Publication
2003
Volume ID
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Issue ID
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Page(s)
12-17
Language
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Connective Phrase
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Location/URL
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ISSN
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Notes
Title also in PubMed - A high fidelity tissue-based cardiac surgical similar for European Journal of Cardiothorac Surgery 27 (2005) 910-916
Abstract
Cardiac surgery training in a realistic surgical environment is assisted by a simulator based on an electromechanical pneumatic pump with associated control and display software. In this paper we describe a feedback mechanism for controlling the beating mode of the simulator by means of a electronic pressure sensor incorporated into the pneumatic pump. The sensor was incorporated into an electronic data acquisition board and was used to trigger a ventricular fibrillation (cardiac arrest) mode in the pump control system when the heart attached to the pump is handled by the trainee surgeon, as is typically experienced in a real operation. The mode change also results in changes to simulated vital signs including ECG and pressure traces which are displayed on a monitor within the surgical training environment. Software is described which was designed to drive the pump at various beating rates, display the vital signs, and respond to pressure sensor measurements. The work described is the continuation of a collaboration between the University Hospital of the West Indies (UHWI), the School of Engineering at the University of Technology, Jamaica (UTech), and the Department of Mathematics & Computer Science at the University of the West Indies (UWI), which has the aim of producing a computer controlled device and training system capable of simulating the range of intra-operative cardiac behaviours typically found in heart surgery, in order to improve training of resident surgeons.....
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