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Publication Type
Conference Proceedings
UWI Author(s)
Author, Analytic
Quinn, Norman J.; Sammuel, Rebecca; Kojis, Barbara L.
Author Role
Presenter
Author Affiliation
Centre for Marine Sciences
Paper/Section Title
Papua New Guinea's participation in a global assessment of human effects on coral reefs 1998-2000. [Abstract]
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Proceedings Title
Tenth international coral reef symposium
Date of Meeting
June 27 - July 2, 2004
Place of Meeting
Okinawa, Japan
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Abstract
The transformation of Papua New Guinea's economy has altered the use of coral reefs. Today, reefs are increasingly fished commercially, visited by tourist divers, and impacted by resource exploitation. The impact of these activities on the reef ecosystem needs to be assessed. Using the reef check protocol, University of Papua New Guinea students conducted surveys on reefs in Kavleng, Kimbe Harbour, Tufi, Madang and the Papuan Lagoon from May 1998 to June 2000. Students were taught scuba skills and marine survey techniques. From an initial group of 32 students, 15 students successfully completed PADI open water dive certification and 11 students participated in Reef Check Surveys. Survey results indicated that offshore reefs still retained large fish populations are exemplified by the large schools of Maori wrasse within 15km of Port Moresby. Tridanca clams, lobsters, and Triton shells (Charonia tritonis) were very rare. Butterfly fish were common on most reefs. Also, coral cover was high and there was on evident of recent deaths either by bleaching or Acanthaster planci. There was no evidence that dynamite or poison was used on any reefs. The PNG Dive Operators Organization supports a mooring program which reduces the damage caused by anchors on reefs used by tourist boats. None of the reefs had any noticeable anchor damage or trash. The provincial towns close to the reef surveyed were small and sewage discharge did not impact surveyed reefs. The main human impact on PNGs reefs is from coastal artisanal fisheries. Subsequent to these surveys a fish processing plant has opened in Madang with reports of foul smelling discharges into the sea. The Madang reefs should be resurveyed to ascertain any impacts from the fish processing plant and to determine if any recommendations need to be submitted to the local or national government of PNG.....
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