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Publication Type
Journal Article
Author, Analytic
Forrester, Terrence E. ; Adeyemo, Adebowale A.; Soarres-Wynter, Suzanne; Sargeant, Lincoln A.; Bennett, Franklyn I.; Wilks, Rainford J.; Luke, Amy; Prewitt, E.; Kramer, Holly; Cooper, Richard S.
Author Affiliation, Ana.
Tropical Medicine Research Institute; Department of Pathology
Article Title
A randomized trial on sodium reduction in two developing countries
Medium Designator
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Connective Phrase
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Journal Title
Journal of human hypertension
Translated Title
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Reprint Status
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Date of Publication
2005
Volume ID
19
Issue ID
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Page(s)
55-60
Language
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Connective Phrase
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Location/URL
http:; www.nature.com/jhh/journal/v19/n1/pdf/1001782a.pdf
ISSN
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Notes
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Abstract
Hypertension remains the most common cardiovascular risk factor in developing countries, yet the majority of patients have no access to pharmacological therapy. Population-wide preventive strategies, such as salt restriction, are an attractive alternative, but experience in resource-poor settings in limited. To address this question, we conducted a randomized crossover study of salt restriction in adults living in Nigeria and Jamaica in order to estimate the mean blood pressure (BP) response. After a 4-week run-in period to determine willingness to adhere to a low salt diet, 56 Jamaicans and 58 Nigerians completed an 8-week crossover study of low-salt and high-salt intake. Baseline BPs were in the normotensive range (systolic = 125 mm Hg in Jamaica, 114 mm Hg in Nigeria). Baseline urinary sodium excretion was 86.8 and 125.6 mEq/day in Nigerian and Jamaica, respectively. The mean difference between urinary sodium excretion at baseline and at the end of the 3-week low-sodium phase was 33.6 mEq/day in Nigeria and 57.5 mEq/day in Jamaica. During the high-sodium phase, mean change in urinary sodium excretion from baseline to week 3 was 35.0 and 5.5mEq/day in Nigeria and Jamaica, respectively. The mean change in systolic BP ('high' vs. 'low' sodium phase) was approximately 5 mmHg in both groups. This study suggests that the efficacy of sodium reduction in developing countries equals those noted in more affluent cultures. If promoted on a wide scale, sodium reduction could be used to treat persons with established hypertension, and more importantly, to prevent age-related increases in BP in poor communities.....
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