View
Publication Type
Conference Proceedings
Author, Analytic
Wilks, Rainford J.; Younger, Novie O.; Cooper, Richard S.; Luke, Amy; Bennett, Franklyn I.; McFarlane-Anderson, Norma; Forrester, Terrence E.
Author Role
Presenters
Author Affiliation
Tropical Medicine Research Institute; Department of Pathology; Department of Basic Medical Scences
Paper/Section Title
Cardiovascular Risk Factors and Mortality in Jamaica: Significant Sexual Dimorphism
Medium Designator
n/a
Connective Phrase
n/a
Editor/Compiler
n/a
Editor/Compiler Role
n/a
Proceedings Title
Congress of Epidemiology
Date of Meeting
June 13-16, 2001
Place of Meeting
Toronto, Canada
Place of Publication
n/a
Publisher Name
n/a
Date of Publication
n/a
Date of Copyright
n/a
Volume ID
n/a
Location in Work
n/a
Extent of Work
n/a
Packaging Method
n/a
Series Editor
n/a
Series Editor Role
n/a
Series Title
n/a
Series Volume ID
n/a
Location/URL
n/a
ISBN
n/a
Notes
Also abstracted in the Supplement of the American Journal of Epidemiology Volume 153 Number 11. (Abstract#1720).
Abstract
Jamaica has seen significant disease transition. Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) now account for 42% of mortality. Risk factors for CVD include hypertension (HTN), obesity, elevated lipids, diabetes (DM), smoking and excess alcohol. A prevalence survey for CVD risk factors in an urban population from Spanish Town, Jamaica between 1993 and 1998 recruited a random sample of 2096 persons 25-74 years old (848 men; 1248 women) and collected medical history, anthropometry, blood pressure, plasma glucose and serum lipids. Mean age for men and women was similar (~ 46 years) but there was significant sexual dimorphism in body composition: body mass index (BMI) (23.9 vs 28.0 Kg/m2); waist circumference (WC)(81.0 vs 83.3 cm); waist hip ratio (WHR)(0.84 vs 0.80); fat mass (FM)(15.8 vs 26.9 Kg); % fat mass (FM%)(21.0 vs 35.3) for men and women respectively. Based on published criteria for increased CVD risk, a higher percent(%) of females appeared to be at risk : increased WC 59.6 vs 15.9; obesity 34.0 vs 8.7; increased WHR 46.0 vs 7.3; (DM)15.6 vs 11.3; HTN 28.5 vs 20.0; increased total cholesterol 31.8 vs 23.9; and increased LDL cholesterol 39.3 vs 28.8. Higher percent (%) of men were at increased risk in tobacco use 36.5 vs 11.4; alcohol use 61.4 vs 18.2 and low HDL cholesterol levels 12.7 vs 10.3. These findings are consistent with local mortality data where rates in women and men per 100,000 are: CVD 86.3 vs 69.4; heart diseases 62.1 vs 70.9; HTN diseases 36.6 vs 27.6 and DM 76.2 vs 47.7 respectively. These data have implications for health policy and education.....
read more