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Publication Type
Conference Proceedings
UWI Author(s)
Author, Analytic
Thomas, Joan A.; Lipps, Garth
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Author Affiliation
Department of Sociology, Psychology and Social Work
Paper/Section Title
Subjective well-being of adults with homozygous sickle cell disease in the Sickle Cell Disease Cohort Study. [Abstract]
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Proceedings Title
13th Annual Research Conference Faculty of Medical Sciences
Date of Meeting
November 10 -12 2004
Place of Meeting
Mona
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Abstract
Objective: Compares the subjective well-being of adults with homozygous sickle cell disease (SS) to a matched comparison group of non-sickle cell adults (AA). Explores the predictive power of the top-down explanation of subjective well-being. Method: Seventy-five (75) SS patients and 67 AA adults from the Sickle Cell Disease Cohort Study were interviewed between January and April, 2004. The Ferran and Powers Quality of Life Index and the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule were used to assess subjective well being. Analysis of variance and multiple regression analyses were used to examine differences between the groups. Results: SS patients were less satisfied with their lives overall (p < 0.001), their health and functioning (p < 0.001), social and economic situation (p < 0.01) and psychological functioning (p < 0.05) than AA adults. SS patients reported lower levels of positive affect (p < 0.001) but similar levels of negative affect as AA adults (p > 0.05). Unemployed SS patients were less satisfied with their lives overall (p < 0.01), health and functioning (p < 0.05), psychological functioning (p < 0.001) and social and economic situation (p < 0.05) than all other adults. SS patients with lower occupational status were less satisfied with their family life (p < 0.05) than all other adults. Personality factors (positive and negative affectivity) were stronger predictors of overall life satisfaction and specific domain satisfactions than sickle cell status, consistent with the predictions of the top down model of subjective well-being. Suggests that subjective well-being is compromised in patients with homozygous sickle cell disease. Concludes that these patients may benefit from interventions designed to improve their subjective well-being.....
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