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Publication Type
Conference Proceedings
UWI Author(s)
Author, Analytic
Osei, Philip D.
Author Role
Presenter
Author Affiliation
Sir Arthur Lewis Institute of Social and Economic Studies
Paper/Section Title
Alternative approaches to state-led poverty reduction in the Caribbean: Unfolding experience in Jamaica
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Proceedings Title
Sixth Annual SALISES Conference: Governance, Institutions and Economic Growth: Reflections on Arthur Lewis’ Theory of Economic Growth
Date of Meeting
March 17-18, 2005
Place of Meeting
Jamaica Pegasus Hotel. Kingston, Jamaica
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Notes
Also presented at the Thirtieth Annual Conference of the Caribbean Studies Association. May 30 - June 4, 2005. Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic.
Abstract
The contemporary debates on social development seem to have resolved a number of key questions regarding who should be responsible for providing services for the poor. In one way or another, participants in the development debate seem to have agreed that considering its strategic role in the political economy in terms of policy formulation and regulation and because it wields the instruments of fiscal policy, the state should firmly be in charge of ensuring better services. But an aspect of the consensus reached under neo-liberal development theory, enjoins a placid approach to the implementation and management of public policy. This placid approach includes the exercise of flexibility in the choice of institutional agency when it comes to implementation. Hence, all kinds of flexible arrangements have been advocated including privatisation of services. Within this paradigm a sphere has been created for the non-state sector to play an augmented role in service delivery for the poor, in what has been described as 'democratizing development' by John Clark (1991). This paper examines the translation and operationalization of the European Union's concept of 'decentralized co-operation' in Jamaica in which non-state actors (NSAs) have been assigned a significant role in poverty reduction policy. This non-state leadership model, while it resonates with the government's community development approach to poverty eradication, simultaneously represents a diametrically opposed view in its modus operandi. The paper examines the non-state leadership model of poverty reduction and assesses its main features and the challenges it poses to the established policy regimen. This paper is an exposition, and it aims at concept building and comparative policy analysis.....
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