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Publication Type
Conference Proceedings
UWI Author(s)
Author, Analytic
Northover, Patricia
Author Role
Presenter
Author Affiliation
Sir Arthur Lewis Institute of Social and Economic Studies
Paper/Section Title
Rethinking the problem of 'economic growth' in the Caribbean: the methodological problems in standard modernization commitments for the region
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Proceedings Title
Sixth Annual SALISES Conference: Governance, Institutions and Economic Growth: Reflections on Arthur Lewis’ Theory of Economic Growth
Date of Meeting
March 17-18, 2005
Place of Meeting
Jamaica Pegasus Hotel. Kingston, Jamaica
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Location/URL
http:; www.cavehill.uwi.edu/salises/conferences/conf_2005.htm
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Abstract
Under contemporary pressures of globalization the Caribbean community (CARICOM) seems threatened by increasing global and regional insecurity, vulnerability and marginalization as they are seemingly once again carried across another middle passage rite in the turbulent waves of a neo-liberal globalization. But what exactly are the preconditions for the region's success in this dynamic and complex global world? This question, a recurrent one in the history of the region, was the substantive problem that Arthur Lewis spent his passions in his quest to reposition the region in the then global order. In this paper, the author explores this difficult question and points towards elements of an answer that is relevant for the contemporary context and which prioritizes analyses about ontology and politics. This is done through a critical engagement of perspectives on regional success which interpret growth as simply the outcome of a state or market determined process of competitive modernization/industrialization. She argues along the lines of Lloyd Best's critique of Caribbean epistemology, that securing the region's survival and beyond, still requires an escape from functionalist, aprioristic and deterministic analytical methodologies, in order to properly explore the paths for regional ascent, and the nature of the relationship between society, economy and the state. At a minimum, she argues that a reliance on methodologies that can accommodate process and complex open systems analysis, will be required to pursue the needed research into the particularities of the social and political processes shaping the 'state of the state' and the complexity of real interests influencing the State in its unfolding role in relating to the society, to enable a Caribbean C/creole development. Such new departures, would help one to better identity the social forces for enabling or helping to catalyze the strategically embedded state and to better identity particularly important strategic political repositioning imperatives for enhancing the development of social capabilities for a Caribbean C/creole strategy of endogenous regional integration/development. In demonstrating this point, the paper draws upon an alternative model of social power developed in previous papers in order to try to show the role that constructions of 'rurality' and processes of rural play in shaping the future of modern state systems, modernity, and the possibilities of different and more empowering human experiences under contemporary globalization.....
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