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Publication Type
Conference Proceedings
UWI Author(s)
Author, Analytic
Osei, Philip D.
Author Role
Presenter
Author Affiliation
Sir Arthur Lewis Institute of Social and Economic Studies
Paper/Section Title
Regulation in a flux: The development of regulatory institutions for public utilities in Ghana and Jamaica
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Proceedings Title
Fourth Annual Sir Arthur Lewis Institute for Social and Economic Research Conference: Development and policy for small states in the context of global change
Date of Meeting
January 15 - 17, 2003
Place of Meeting
Barbados
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Location/URL
http:; www.cavehill.uwi.edu/salises/conferences/2003/REGULATIONINAFLUX-Osei.pdf
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Abstract
The above quotation appears in Lewis's review of the development process in which he assesses lessons learned in the two decades leading up to the writing of his paper. This view, which was expressed about three decades ago, still resonates with the state of affairs in contemporary development management. It acknowledges what we know today about the weaknesses of public administration systems in the Caribbean and why the recent reforms have been necessary to refine the role of the state. Since the latter part of the 1980s, regulation as a mode of governance has received a lot of scholarly attention in the public policy literature. In particular, initial theoretical and empirical explorations has tended to establish whether there is indeed a 'regulatory state' in the advanced industrialized countries. Centres of regulatory studies have been established at the University of Manchester and London School of Economics to further the theoretical development of the field. In connection with these developments, the review of the role of the state in national development which took place in developing countries in the 1980s has necessitated a parallel re-examination of the governance agenda in 198 developing countries which have been encouraged to establish reliable regulatory framework while they minimise their direct involvement in economic production in order to facilitate participation by the private sector and civil society. This paper does not seek to establish whether there is a regulatory state in Ghana or Jamaica, but it represents an initial attempt to map out the development of regulatory institutions for the governance of public utilities in the two countries. It discusses the groaning of the two governments as they grappled with policy choice as to which institutions to adopt and the teething problems in the processes towards institutional refinement. Also in this paper, the issue of regulatory independence is explored, and a number of observations made about how to improve institutional choice and refine the workings of existing ones.....
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