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Publication Type
Conference Proceedings
UWI Author(s)
Author, Analytic
Severin, Francis O.
Author Role
Presenter
Author Affiliation
School of Continuing Studies
Paper/Section Title
A Role for ‘Teachers-Only’ at the University of the West Indies
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Proceedings Title
Fifth Annual Conference and Annual General Meeting of ACHEA: Innovation and Action for Success in Higher Education
Date of Meeting
July 6-9, 2005
Place of Meeting
Hilton Tobago
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Abstract
This paper provides a backdrop against which the issue involving the promotion of academic staff (teaching) based on their teaching competence vis-a-vis research output might be discussed. Though the issue has been visited, at The University of the West Indies stakeholders have failed to arrive at a compromise regarding an appropriate weighting of these functions, assuming there might be plausibly discrete responsibilities at a modern university. The matter assumes more significance as higher education institutions seek to become more relevant to the social and economic demands of their clientele – the public and private sectors, government and industry – and even to justify their existence. Alongside this is a renewed commitment to undergraduate teaching ‘pushed’ by a demand to give students their money’s worth. In the nineteenth century a new mission or role – (research, both pure and, more recently, applied -) was added to the traditional transmission of knowledge via teaching by higher education institutions. The author argues that some of the questions that Caribbean higher education institutions in general, and the UWI in particular, will be forced to address are: (a) The educational outcomes to be achieved with respect to clientele (b) Priorities in the context of limited resources, especially given increasing competition from international and national higher education institutions, and the creation of a “single enlarged economic space” (c) What clientele want (d) The structures in place, in terms of defining and motivating our academic staff to deliver on clients’ wants. The paper offers reflections on these matters, drawing from a broad range of literature from sociology of education, economics and human resource development, in the context of finding a role for academic staff who can fit into the cast of ‘good teachers’.....
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