View
Publication Type
Conference Proceedings
UWI Author(s)
Author, Analytic
Moore, Kendall; Muturi, Nancy
Author Role
Presenter
Author Affiliation
Caribbean Institute of Media Communications
Paper/Section Title
The real face of AIDS: Obstacles for producing television public service announcements involving people living with AIDS in Jamaica
Medium Designator
n/a
Connective Phrase
n/a
Editor/Compiler
n/a
Editor/Compiler Role
n/a
Proceedings Title
International Association of Media and Communication Research (IAMCR)
Date of Meeting
July 26- 28, 2005
Place of Meeting
Taipei, Taiwan
Place of Publication
n/a
Publisher Name
n/a
Date of Publication
n/a
Date of Copyright
n/a
Volume ID
n/a
Location in Work
n/a
Extent of Work
n/a
Packaging Method
n/a
Series Editor
n/a
Series Editor Role
n/a
Series Title
n/a
Series Volume ID
n/a
Location/URL
n/a
ISBN
n/a
Notes
n/a
Abstract
This presentation draws on the author's experience learned in the classroom setting at the Caribbean Institute of Media and Communication,University of the West Indies using television as a public education tool, to produce public service announcements (PSAs) featuring people with AIDS (PWAs). It focuses specifically on the ways in which PWA experience vulnerability, stigma and discrimination, when they participate in television broadcasts. Participant-PWAs helped advance the understanding of the obstacles they confront when their images are used in a testimonial format for television. Additional methodologies used for this research include: interviews, focus groups, and discussion with perspectives heard from Journalists, PWAs, researchers, students, civilians, and clergy. Key findings in the following topical areas discussed are: perception of non-fiction uses vs, contrived message making; comparison of radio, television and print journalism to address HIV/AIDS featuring PWAs ; lack of media technology training in the public sector ; homophobia and the implications that it has on HIV/AIDS education; and protection mechanisms for PWAs. Though focus group research indicates that the use of non-fiction narratives is an effective way to build public awareness, PWAs say there is little advantage for them in the exchange. Findings show that disclosure of sero- positive status has led to: loss of job, exclusion from churches, schools, and other public institutions, and has led to violence and perhaps murder and suicide.....
read more