View
Publication Type
Conference Proceedings
UWI Author(s)
Author, Analytic
Muturi, Nancy
Author Role
Presenter
Author Affiliation
Caribbean Institute of Media Communication
Paper/Section Title
Gender-based violence and women's reproductive health in Jamaica: A communications perspective
Medium Designator
n/a
Connective Phrase
n/a
Editor/Compiler
n/a
Editor/Compiler Role
n/a
Proceedings Title
International Communication Association
Date of Meeting
May 27-31, 2004
Place of Meeting
New Orleans
Place of Publication
n/a
Publisher Name
n/a
Date of Publication
n/a
Date of Copyright
n/a
Volume ID
n/a
Location in Work
n/a
Extent of Work
n/a
Packaging Method
n/a
Series Editor
n/a
Series Editor Role
n/a
Series Title
n/a
Series Volume ID
n/a
Location/URL
n/a
ISBN
n/a
Notes
Also presented as 'Gender-based violence and women's reproductive health : the situation in Jamaica' at the 18th Conference on Health Promotion and Health Education, April 26-30, 2004 in Melbourne, Australia.
Abstract
Violence against women, whether physical, mental, sexual or otherwise, is widespread world wide and has been commonplace throughout history and spans all ages, classes and racial groups. In the Caribbean, the most prevalent forms of gender-based violence include wife beating, rape and incest all of which have dire consequences on women, regardless of age. These consequences include the risk of sexually transmitted infections including HIV/AIDS, unplanned pregnancies and other complications that affect their physical and psychological well-being. This study explores the situation, impact of gender-based violence on reproductive health in Jamaica and the existing gaps in addressing the problem in this age of HIV/AIDS epidemic. Data for this study are gathered qualitatively through naturalistic inquiry including participant observation, in-depth interviews, note taking and review of existing documents published and unpublished. Key findings indicate that a combination of social, cultural, economic and political factors contribute to the existing violence. Reproductive health programs have also not addressed men as an important stakeholder in women's health. These factors are reinforced by the lack of policies, legal or administrative system that condemns or punishes gender-based violence.....
read more