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Publication Type
Book Chapter
UWI Author(s)
Author, Analytic
Bastick, Tony
Author Affiliation, Ana.
Department of Educational Studies
Title, Analytic
Does disruptive classroom behaviour make adolescent Caribbean students more popular or less popular with their peers?
Medium Designator
n/a
Connective Phrase
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Author, Monographic
Bastick, Tony; Ezenne, Austin
Author Role
Editors
Title, Monographic
Teaching Caribbean students: Research on social issues in the Caribbean and abroad
Reprint Status
Refereed
Edition
n/a
Place of Publication
Kingston, Jamaica
Publisher Name
Department of Educational Studies, UWI
Date of Publication
2003
Volume ID
n/a
Issue ID
n/a
Page(s)
387-402
Series Editor
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Series Editor Role
n/a
Series Title
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Series Volume Identification
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Series Issue Identification
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Connective Phrase
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Location/URL
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Notes
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Abstract
Considers the inter-group dynamics related to self-regulatory behaviour of adolescents in classroom. It investigates whether this 'problem' behaviour is being socially promoted by making the perpetrators more popular with their peers or whether it is being socially inhibited by making the perpetrators less popular with their peers. To answer these questions three sub-scales of Humphrey's Children's Perceived Self-Control Scale were administered to 18 classes of Jamaican adolescent students (N=17). In addition, same-sex popularity and opposite-sex popularity were assessed for each student using in-class sociometric nominations and ratings. Results showed that females had significantly higher self-regulatory control than males (p<0.005) and that those students, both male and female, who resisted aggression and stayed on task were more popular with the opposite sex (p<0.005). The utility of these results is that peer-popularity and sexual attractiveness are strong modifiers of adolescent behaviour that may be utilised to promote pro-social behaviours.....
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