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Publication Type
Journal Article
Author, Analytic
Bell, Y. ; Barton, M. ; Thame, M.M. ; Nicholson, A. ; Trotman, Helen L.
Author Affiliation, Ana.
Department of Obstetrics, Gynaecology and Child Health
Article Title
Neonatal sepsis in Jamaican neonates [Abstract]
Medium Designator
n/a
Connective Phrase
n/a
Journal Title
Annals of Tropical Paediatrics
Translated Title
n/a
Reprint Status
n/a
Date of Publication
2005
Volume ID
25
Issue ID
4
Page(s)
293-6
Language
eng
Connective Phrase
n/a
Location/URL
n/a
ISSN
0272-4936 (Print)
Notes
n/a
Abstract
AIM: To determine the incidence and causative organisms of bacterial sepsis in neonates at The University Hospital of the West Indies. METHODS: A retrospective review of all neonates with culture-proven sepsis admitted to the hospital between January 1995 and December 2000 was conducted. Incidence rates and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns were determined. RESULTS: There were 4702 admissions to the neonatal unit during the study period. Of these, 135 had culture-proven sepsis and 115 were inborn, giving an incidence of 6.7/1000 live births. There were 89 positive blood cultures, 51 positive urine cultures and two positive CSF cultures. The single most common organism was Klebsiella spp (28%). Other organisms included Escherichia coli (16%), group B Streptococcus (11%) and Enterobacter spp (10%). The aminoglycoside resistance rate of Klebsiella spp was 46% and seven isolates had multiple resistance to antibiotics. There was a case fatality rate of 6.7%. CONCLUSION: Physicians involved in newborn care at The University Hospital of the West Indies need to recognise the important role Klebsiella now plays in neonatal sepsis and its contribution to neonatal mortality. Empirical antibiotic regimens for gram-negative sepsis must take into consideration the high rates of aminoglycoside resistance that are now prevalent....
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