View
Publication Type
Conference Proceedings
Author, Analytic
Webster, Seymour; Mitchell, Sylvia A.; Ahmad, Mohammed H
Author Role
Presenters
Author Affiliation
Biotechnology Centre
Paper/Section Title
In vitro propagation of some medical plants commercial value
Medium Designator
n/a
Connective Phrase
n/a
Editor/Compiler
n/a
Editor/Compiler Role
n/a
Proceedings Title
Proceedings of the Sixth Conference, Faculty of Pure and Applied Sciences edited by Daniel Coore and Robert J.Lancashire.
Date of Meeting
March 18-20, 2003
Place of Meeting
University of the West Indies, Mona. Kingston, Jamaica
Place of Publication
Kingston, JamaicaKingston, Jamaica
Publisher Name
Faculty of Pure and Applied Sciences
Date of Publication
2003
Date of Copyright
n/a
Volume ID
n/a
Location in Work
80-81
Extent of Work
n/a
Packaging Method
n/a
Series Editor
n/a
Series Editor Role
n/a
Series Title
n/a
Series Volume ID
n/a
Location/URL
n/a
ISBN
976-41-0087-2
Notes
n/a
Abstract
The economic and therapeutic value of medicinal plants and functional foods are significant interest to both users and researchers. To facilitate this development, clean “elite” germplasm is essential. Furthermore, in vitro preservation of important and endangered plant species is of paramount importance within the context of a fledging industry. It is against the background that a number of medicinal plants have been initiated into in vitro culture. Nodal and tip cuttings from several medicinal plants of commercial value were introduced into culture. The explants were taken form the following plants (grown in vivo at the Biotechnology centre UWI, Mona): Jack-in-the-bush (Eupatorium odoratum), Spanish needle (Bidens pilosa), Rice Bitters (Andrographis paniculata), Mimosa (Mimsoa pudica), John Charles (Hyptis verticillata), Vervine (Stachyarpheta jamaicensis), Wild Sage (Lantana camara), French tyme (Plectranthus ambionicus), Dog Blood (Rivina humilis), and Coffee rose (italic Ervatamia divaricata). Explants were first washed with soap under a tap then trimmed to approximately 10 cm pieces. They were placed in a fungicide mix (1% benalate with a few drops of Tween 20) for two hours. Sterilization with a 20% bleach solution followed. The nodal sections and tip cuttings were initiated on MS basal Medium (Murashige and Skoog) solidified with 0.2% phytogel and 15% sucrose as the major energy source. Three media: A (MS), B (MS+0.2mg1¯¹ BAP) and C MS+0.2mgl¯¹ BAP and 0.02mgl¯¹ IBA) were used for each plant, and 10 baby food jar were used per media. The explants were incubated in baby food jars at an ambient temperature of 23-25ºC. Within one week, contamination ranged between 3-86% for bacterial contamination and 13-96% for fungal infection. During the second week there was a further (3-17%) bacterial and 3-10% fungal contamination. Using the fungicide mix decreased contamination of Eupatorium odoratum form 100% to 70%. The plants with the cleanest explants were Plectranthus amboinicus (23%), Rivina humilis (23%) and Eupatorium odoratum (30%). The implications research and future directions to be taken will be discussed. ....
read more