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Publication Type
Conference Proceedings
Author, Analytic
Wiggins-Grandison, Margaret D.; DeMets, Charles
Author Role
Presenters
Author Affiliation
Earthquake Research Unit
Paper/Section Title
GPS measurements of slip rates Jamaican faults
Medium Designator
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Editor/Compiler
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Editor/Compiler Role
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Proceedings Title
Proceedings of the Sixth Conference of the Faculty of Pure and Applied Sciences edited by Daniel N. Coore and Robert J Lancashire.
Date of Meeting
March 18-20, 2003
Place of Meeting
University of the West Indies, Mona. Kingston, Jamaica
Place of Publication
Kingston, Jamaica
Publisher Name
Faculty of Pure and Applied Sciences
Date of Publication
2003
Date of Copyright
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Volume ID
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Location in Work
73
Extent of Work
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Packaging Method
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Series Editor
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Series Editor Role
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Series Title
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Location/URL
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ISBN
976-41-0087-2
Notes
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Abstract
One of the poorly understood, yet important questions about the present tectonics of Jamaica is the rate at which strain accumulates across its major faults. Rapid rates of strain accumulation imply shorter intervals between major earthquakes and if measured, can provide useful information for earthquake forecasting and probability analysis. Over the past three years, we have installed a network of 20 geodetic markers spanning all of the major faults of Jamaica to enable high-precision measurements of the displacements of these sites using Global Positioning Systems technology. GPS receivers record continuously at three sites, two of which are co-located with seismometers operated by the Earthquake Unit. In addition, we occupy the other 17 sites with a geodetic-grade GPS receiver 1-2 weeks per year. The time series of site coordinates form these 20 sites will eventually define the crustal velocity field in Jamaica. Our results to date indicate that the island of Jamaica is moving 5-10 millimeters per year towards the west-south-west with respects to stable oceanic crust several hundred miles south of the island (i.e. with respect to the rigid interior of the Caribbean plate). Our data are still too immature too define a gradient in motion across Jamaica that might indicate the presence of faults that are actively accumulating strain. To date, the simplest interpretation of the available data implies the existence of a submarine fault south of Jamaica that accommodates as much as 10 millimeters per year of slip. We expect this results and our interpretation change as our data mature and the noise inherent in our measurement is averaged down.....
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