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Publication Type
Journal Article
Author, Analytic
Lindo, Jascinth L. M.; McCaw-Binns, Affette M. ; LaGrenade, J. ; Jackson, M. ; Eldemire-Shearer, D.
Author Affiliation, Ana.
n/a
Article Title
Mental well-being of doctors and nurses in two hospitals in Kingston, Jamaica
Medium Designator
n/a
Connective Phrase
n/a
Journal Title
West Indian Medical Journal
Translated Title
n/a
Reprint Status
n/a
Date of Publication
2006
Volume ID
55
Issue ID
3
Page(s)
153-9
Language
eng
Connective Phrase
n/a
Location/URL
http:; caribbean.scielo.org/pdf/wimj/v55n3/a05v55n3.pdf
ISSN
0043-3144 (Print)
Notes
n/a
Abstract
Hospital work involves some of the most stressful situations found in any workplace. Furthermore, hospital workers may be affected by non-work-related stress such as family responsibilities and financial difficulties, leading to impaired mental well-being and suboptimal performance. The aim of this study was to assess the level of general mental well-being among doctors and nurses from two hospitals in Kingston, Jamaica. A total of 212 doctors and nurses at the Kingston Public Hospital and the University Hospital of the West Indies were studied yielding a participation rate of 83.1%. A self-administered questionnaire was used to gather social and biomedical data and the General Health Questionnaire 30 (GHQ 30) used to determine general mental well-being. Probable caseness was defined as a GHQ 30 score > 5. Focus group discussions were also held with staff at both hospitals. A total of 27.4% of the study population met the GHQ-30 criteria (caseness) defining them as probable cases of mental distress. Cases and non-cases were not different in age, gender or hospital of employment. However, caseness was associated with years of professional experience, work-related and non-work-related stress, serious financial difficulties and fears of coming to work. Significant predictors of increased risk of caseness were fear of coming to work (OR 3.06; CI 1.40, 6.70); professional experience in excess of five-years and high non-work-related stress. High work-related stress was associated with reduced risk of being classified a case, suggesting that work may have been therapeutic. Focus group discussions suggested that non-work stress was related to financial difficulties, commuting and child care, especially among nurses. Intervention to improve general mental well-being should be targeted at new employees and should address child care, commuting and financial management.....
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