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Publication Type
Conference Proceedings
Author, Analytic
Robinson, Edward; Kahn, Shakira
Author Role
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Author Affiliation
Marine Geology Unit
Paper/Section Title
Some physical factors influencing adaptation to coastal changes
Medium Designator
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Connective Phrase
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Editor/Compiler
Reeson, Peter; Rose, Don
Editor/Compiler Role
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Proceedings Title
Jamaica Institute of Environmental Professionals - Third National Conference on the Environment
Date of Meeting
May 15-17, 2007
Place of Meeting
Kingston, Jamaica
Place of Publication
Kingston, Jamaica
Publisher Name
Jamaica Institute of Environmental Professionals
Date of Publication
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Date of Copyright
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Volume ID
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Location in Work
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Extent of Work
28
Packaging Method
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Series Editor
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Series Editor Role
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Series Title
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Series Volume ID
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Notes
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Abstract
We outline some of the physical, mainly geological factors and processes that currently and increasingly in the future, will influence the nature of the Jamaican coastline. We will also outline the environmental changes and hazards that need to be addressed during the ongoing development of coastal comunities and the tourist industry. The factors include, but are not limited to, the geomorphology and geology (lithologies and structural features) of the shoreline and immediate backshore region, as well as the island shelf in front of the shoreline. There are a large number of permutations and combinations of shoreline types that can be recognized, rangng from flat to mountainous. The island shelf ranges from broad to narrow, and may be associated with features ranging from coral reefs to river estuaries. Particular combinations will influence the degree of vulnerability to hurricane surge and damage, the extent of marine inundation, extent of riverine flooding landslips and debris flows. Ongoing global climate change will have additional effects, for example on the future health of reef systems, particularly as regards the ability of these systems to provide replacement sediment to carbonate beaches. Siliciclastic beaches have the potential to receive increasing amounts of sediment from watersheds that are progressively stripped of vegetation and soil cover. While the extent of sea level rise is now thought to be less than previously estimated, it will still be a threat to some low-lying communities, critical facilities and other coastal developments. We will discuss the factors involved using specific examples from our coastline.....
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