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Publication Type
Journal Article
UWI Author(s)
Author, Analytic
Trotman, Helen ; Bell, Y
Author Affiliation, Ana.
Department of Obstetrics, Gynaecology and Child Health
Article Title
Neonatal group B streptococcal infection at the University Hospital of the West Indies, Jamaica: a 10-year experience
Medium Designator
n/a
Connective Phrase
n/a
Journal Title
Annals of Tropical Paediatrics
Translated Title
n/a
Reprint Status
n/a
Date of Publication
2006
Volume ID
26
Issue ID
1
Page(s)
53-7
Language
eng
Connective Phrase
n/a
Location/URL
n/a
ISSN
0272-4936 (Print)
Notes
n/a
Abstract
AIM: To describe the incidence, clinical presentation and outcome of neonatal group B streptococcal (GBS) infection at the University Hospital of the West Indies (UHWI). METHODS: A 10-year retrospective review of all inborn neonates admitted to the neonatal unit of UHWI with GBS infection between 1 January 1991 and 31 December 2000 was conducted. Differences in maternal and neonatal characteristics between early- and late-onset disease (EOD, LOD) were determined. RESULTS: There were 32,029 live births and 29 neonates were admitted for GBS infection, an incidence of 0.91/1000 live births (95% CI 0.58-1.23/1000). Twenty-one (72%) neonates had EOD, a rate of 0.66/1000 live births (95% CI 0.38-0.94/1000) and eight (28%) had LOD, a rate of 0.23/1000 (95% CI 0.08-0.42/1000). Seventeen of the 21 (81%) cases of EOD occurred within the 1st 24 hours of life. The most common clinical diagnosis was septicaemia (17, 61%), followed by pneumonia (8, 28%) and meningitis (3, 11%). All five (100%) babies whose mothers' membranes were ruptured for >18 hours had EOD. The babies of all six (100%) women with intrapartum pyrexia went on to have EOD. A greater proportion of babies (63%) with LOD were preterm and of low birthweight. The most common presenting symptom was respiratory distress which occurred more frequently in neonates with EOD, p=0.006. One neonate died, giving a case fatality rate of 3.6%. CONCLUSION: Although the incidence of GBS infection is relatively low at UHWI, further reduction in the incidence might be achieved by implementation of measures to prevent perinatal transmission.....
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