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Publication Type
Book Whole
UWI Author(s)
Author Affiliation, Ana.
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Author, Monographic
Gayle, Herbert
Author Role
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Title, Monographic
Adolescent male survivability in Jamaica
Translated Title
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Reprint Status
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Edition
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Author, Subsidiary
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Author Role
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Place of Publication
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Publisher Name
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Date of Publication
2002
Original Pub Date
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Volume ID
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Extent of Work
140 p.
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Series Editor
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Series Editor Role
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Series Title
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Series Volume ID
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Location/URL
http:; www.futuresgroup.com/documents/3141male.pdf
ISBN
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Notes
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Abstract
For far too long, men had been secondary, even coincidental, subjects of analysis in gender-based studies, particularly those focused on Reproductive Health and Sexuality. By and large they had been studied as contributors to or directly responsible for the challenges faced by women, or as the means to the well being of women and children. Recent studies are gradually transforming the thesis and research methodology, with the result that men are being viewed as an important subject of analysis in their own right. This Review, pulling from existing studies of this type, analyses the life chances of the adolescent male in the challenging socio economic and cultural environment of Jamaica. The study seeks to highlight and clarify critical issues that could be instructive for meaningful policy and program discussions. In the process, foundational assumptions that have instructed the gender paradigm have been challenged; some have been corroborated; fresh theses are raised for examination. Among the challenges raised were concerns regarding the status quo of gender programs. The review concludes that single gender programs have been counterproductive to developmental targets for either gender, and calls for appropriate support systems that are need based rather than gender focused. This needs based approach, particularly if applied to education should be implemented concurrent with resocialization programs for those who contribute to the marginalization of the male in the educational system, the review concludes. For the purposes of this review, this would mean working with the boys as well as their families simultaneously in order to ensure that boys are released into the work force later; are properly trained and allowed to enjoy their childhood. In this regard, the family emerges in this paper as one of the key agents for bringing about this re-socialization due to its significant role in shaping the life of youth. The review recommends as its first pillar for reform, the development of a systemic approach to delaying the entry of young males into the labor market, while qualifying them for their social and professional roles. Proposals to make schools more attractive for boys are offered as an important plank in this objective. The review recommends curricula re-design in line with the needs of the labor market and in line with the technical predilections of male youth. It also addresses the current methods employed to teach boys in order to remove psychological barriers to male achievement including low expectation by teachers. The second pillar of reform concerns high risk and life threatening issues facing adolescent boys, including neglect, violence, drug abuse and poor sexual conduct. The review identifies the emerging issue of sexual abuse of boys as largely ignored and under represented, and proposes specially tailored programs to help victims. As a support recommendation, the review advocates for gender equal enforcement of child prostitution laws to protect not only girls but boys as well. The review suggests that this and other processes of change should be managed by an alliance of concerned agencies and civil society, backed by and involving the media. The review concludes that the multi agency collaboration united with the media would prove to be powerful agents of transformation.....
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