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Publication Type
Conference Proceedings
UWI Author(s)
Author, Analytic
Waugh, C.A.; Robinson, R.D.; Lindo, J.F.; Myrie, C.; /Ashley, D.; Eberhard, M.
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Paper/Section Title
Wild rats as reservoirs of angiostrongylus cantonensis in Jamaica
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Proceedings Title
Annual National Conference on Science and Technology: Science and Technology for Economic Growth and Development: Proceedings of the Seventeenth Annual National Conference on Science and Technology
Date of Meeting
November 19-22, 2003
Place of Meeting
Kingston, Jamaica
Place of Publication
Kingston, Jamaica
Publisher Name
The Scientific Research Council
Date of Publication
2003
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Abstract
The nematode parasite Angiostrongylus cantonensis is the most common cause of eosinophilic meningitis in humans worldwide. Infections are endemic in Asia, the Pacific islands and several other countries, and a case of eosinophilic meningitis was recently reported from Jamaica. In addition, two years ago, an outbreak of eosinophilic meningitis occurred in a group of United States students who visited Jamaica, and several cases were confirmed serologically. This study was designed to determine the status of A. cantonensis infections in wild rats (Rattus spp.) in Jamaica as a step towards better understanding the public health significance of the parasite. Three hundred and thirty five (335) rats were collected from several sites across Jamaica. The animals were dissected and the heart and pulmonary arteries explored Angiostrongylus cantonensis was recovered from 33% of the rats. There was no significant difference in infection rates between R. rattus and R. norvegicus. This report of infections in Jamaican rats extends the range of A. cantonensis to another Caribbean country in addition to Cuba, the Dominican Republic and Puerto Rico. The findings further suggest that authochthonous transmission of the parasite to humans is possible in Jamaica.....
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