View
Publication Type
Conference Proceedings
Author, Analytic
Bakir, Mohammed; Gyles, Collin
Author Role
The development of molecular sensors at UWI for practical applications
Author Affiliation
n/a
Paper/Section Title
n/a
Medium Designator
n/a
Connective Phrase
n/a
Editor/Compiler
n/a
Editor/Compiler Role
n/a
Proceedings Title
Annual National Conference on Science and Technology: Science and Technology for Economic Growth and Development: Proceedings of the Seventeenth Annual National Conference on Science and Technology
Date of Meeting
November 19-22, 2003
Place of Meeting
Kingston, Jamaica
Place of Publication
Kingston, Jamaica
Publisher Name
The Scientific Research Council
Date of Publication
2003
Date of Copyright
n/a
Volume ID
n/a
Location in Work
n/a
Extent of Work
n/a
Packaging Method
n/a
Series Editor
n/a
Series Editor Role
n/a
Series Title
n/a
Series Volume ID
n/a
Location/URL
n/a
ISBN
n/a
Notes
n/a
Abstract
The development of molecular systems sensitive to their surrounding is of interest for their applications in many important processes that include the detection and determination of trace amounts of a variety of biological and industrial substrates. Although a variety of molecular sensors that rely on specialized optical techniques such as fluorescent and circular dichrosim are widely used, the development of transducers for general optical technique such as UV-vis spectrophotometric determination is highly desirable due to their convenient use and availability in general laboratories. At UWI, Mona we have been interested in the development of optical sensors for biological and environmental applications and in recent reports we described the optosensing behaviour of a variety of sensors toward biomolecules that include chemotactic amino acids and glucose and gases such as carbon dioxide. Chemotaxis is the directional migration of cells toward chemical substances in their environment. The activation of this process is important in the migration of macrophage and neutrophills during wound healing, homing of thymocytes, migration of neural crest cells, and aggregation of Dictyostelium cells to form multicellular organisms. In addition, we have reported on the possible use of our sensors for the detection of environmentally important metal ions such as cadmium and mercury. In this presentation, detail analysis of our sensors and their impact on the development of new technologies will be addressed.....
read more