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Publication Type
Book Chapter
Author, Analytic
Mann, P.; DeMets, C.; Wiggins-Grandison, Margaret
Author Affiliation, Ana.
n/a
Title, Analytic
Toward a better understanding of the Late Neogene strike-slip restraining bend in Jamaica: geodetic, geological, and seismic constraints
Medium Designator
n/a
Connective Phrase
n/a
Author, Monographic
CUNNINGHAM, W. D. & MANN, P.
Author Role
Edited by
Title, Monographic
Tectonics of Strike-Slip Restraining and Releasing Bends
Reprint Status
Refereed
Edition
n/a
Place of Publication
London
Publisher Name
Geological Society
Date of Publication
2007
Volume ID
290
Issue ID
n/a
Page(s)
239-253
Series Editor
n/a
Series Editor Role
n/a
Series Title
n/a
Series Volume Identification
n/a
Series Issue Identification
n/a
Connective Phrase
n/a
Location/URL
http:; www.geology.wisc.edu/~chuck/PDF/Mann_Jam_07_SpecVol.pdf
Notes
Tectonics of Strike-Slip Restraining and Releasing Bends Edited by W.D. Cunningham and P. Mann.
Abstract
Describes the regional fault pattern, geological setting and active fault kinematics of Jamaica, from published geological maps, earthquakes and GPS-based geodesy, to support a simple tectonic model for both the initial stage of restraining-bend formation and the subsequent stage of bend bypassing. Restraining-bend formation and widespread uplift in Jamaica began in the Late Miocene, and were probably controlled by the interaction of roughly east–west-trending strike-slip faults with two NNW-trending rifts oriented obliquely to the direction of ENE-trending, Late Neogene interplate shear. The interaction of the interplate strike-slip fault system (Enriquillo- Plantain Garden fault zone) and the oblique rifts has shifted the strike-slip fault trace c. 50 km to the north and created the 150-km-long by 80-km-wide restraining bend that is now morphologically expressed as the island of Jamaica. Recorded earthquakes and recent GPS results from Jamaica illustrate continued bend evolution during the most recent phase of strike-slip displacement, at a minimum GPS-measured rate of 8±1 mm/a. GPS results show a gradient in left-lateral interplate strain from north to south, probably extending south of the island, and a likely gradient along a ENE–WSW cross-island profile. The observed GPS velocity field suggests that left-lateral shear continues to be transmitted across the Jamaican restraining bend by a series of intervening bend structures, including the Blue Mountain uplift of eastern Jamaica.....
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