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Publication Type
Journal Article
UWI Author(s)
Author, Analytic
Bourne, Paul A.
Author Affiliation, Ana.
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Article Title
Self-rated health of the educated and uneducated classes in Jamaica
Medium Designator
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Connective Phrase
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Journal Title
North American Journal of Medical Sciences
Translated Title
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Reprint Status
Refereed
Date of Publication
2010
Volume ID
2
Issue ID
1
Page(s)
407-415
Language
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Connective Phrase
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Location/URL
http:; www.najms.org/resources/PDF+27-35+Self-rated+health+of+the+educated+and+uneducated+classes+in+Jamaica.pdf
ISSN
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Notes
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Abstract
Background: Education provides choices, opportunities, access to resources and it is associated with an increased likelihood of higher income. Does this holds true in developing nations like Jamaica, and does the educated class experience greater self-rated health status than the uneducated classes? Aims: The current study will identify the socio-demographic correlates of self-rated health status of Jamaicans, examine the effects of these variables, explore self-rated health status and self-reported diagnosed recurring illness among the educated and uneducated classes, compute mean income among the different educational types, and determine whether a significant statistical correlation exists between the different educational cohorts. Materials and Methods: The current study utilised the data set of Jamaica Survey Living Conditions which is a cross-sectional survey. It is a national probability survey, and data were collected across the 14 parishes of the island. Stratified random sampling techniques were used to draw the sample. Results: Self-rated health statuses of respondents are correlated with age, income, crowding, sex, marital status, area of residence, and self-reported illness (es) 2= 1,568.4, P < 0.001. Respondents with tertiary level educations were most likely to be classified in the wealthiest 20% (53.4%) and there was no significant statistical difference between their health status and the lower educated classes. Conclusion: There is a need for a public health care campaign that is specifically geared towards the educated classes as their educational achievement is not translating itself into better health care-seeking behaviour and health status than the uneducated classes.....
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