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Publication Type
Book Chapter
Author, Analytic
Bewaji, John A.
Author Affiliation, Ana.
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Title, Analytic
Education and society requiem for western education in Africana societies to transcend plantocracy, coloniality and neo-coloniality.
Medium Designator
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Connective Phrase
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Author, Monographic
Babawale, Tunde
Author Role
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Title, Monographic
Teaching and propagating African history and culture to the diaspora and teaching diaspora history and culture to Africa.
Reprint Status
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Edition
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Place of Publication
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Publisher Name
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Date of Publication
2009
Volume ID
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Issue ID
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Page(s)
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Series Editor
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Series Editor Role
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Series Title
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Series Volume Identification
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Series Issue Identification
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Connective Phrase
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Location/URL
http:; www.cbaac77.com/brazil/brazil_lectures-bewaji.htm
Notes
Electronic Publication
Abstract
Over the centuries, especially since the advent of Western education in Africana societies – continental and Diasporic – it is very clear that there has been very little benefited from Western education, especially tertiary level education, to lift these Africana societies up from peonage, dependency, mendicancy, economic and social stagnation, cultural degeneration and “messenger of the West” (and others) mentality, from those who have been produced by these tertiary institutions. While Western education, in Western societies, builds on its spiritual, historical, social, moral and cultural foundations an infrastructure and superstructure which facilitates, under-girds and deepens socio-economic, technological, cultural and spiritual development of the West, along the lines of greedy conquest and wanton domination of the world (some would argue, the probable self-implosion of the West), Western education in Africana societies has only developed a coterie of artificial, mentally emasculated and culturally denuded persons and leadership, on the one hand, and, on the other hand, literate but culturally uneducated masses of graduates from their institutions, who fail to understand themselves, their societies, their world and the universe properly. In this essay, I examine the factors responsible for this pernicious situation, historically; beginning from the mistaken demarcation of formal from non-formal and informal education in Africana societies, to the point at which Africana communities thoughtlessly embraced the idea that all that it takes to be educated is the amassing of various degrees, diplomas and certificates, to the utter neglect of capacity for critical, moral and humane reflective capacity. I then argue that for education to meet its remit of helping Africana societies to transcend plantocracy, coloniality, neo-coloniality and post-coloniality, there is need for an overhaul of the fundamental assumptions behind education at all levels in Africana societies. Such a task of developing an educational system that is sensitive to the cultures and traditions of Africana peoples is a foundational philosophical one, requiring careful but profound thought on, among others, issues of individual, communal and social identities of persons and communities in Africana world.....
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