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Publication Type
Book Chapter
Author, Analytic
Walker, S. P.; Chang, S. M.
Author Affiliation, Ana.
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Title, Analytic
Intra-uterine growth restriction in developing countries: Impact on child mental development and behaviour
Medium Designator
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Connective Phrase
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Author, Monographic
Preedy, V. R
Author Role
ed
Title, Monographic
Handbook of Growth and Growth Monitoring in Health and Disease
Reprint Status
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Edition
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Place of Publication
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Publisher Name
Springer Science + Business Media, LLC
Date of Publication
2012
Volume ID
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Issue ID
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Page(s)
147-158
Series Editor
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Series Editor Role
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Series Title
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Series Volume Identification
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Series Issue Identification
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Connective Phrase
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Location/URL
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Notes
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Abstract
Infants born low birth weight at term are estimated to comprise 11% of births in developing countries. These infants have experienced intra-uterine growth restriction (IUGR) indicating constraints in the supply of nutrients to the fetus during a critical period for brain development. Several studies have examined the association of term low weight with development in infancy and early childhood and have shown associations with motor and mental development and behavior. There are fewer studies from developing countries of birth weight and ability later in childhood or adolescence and findings are less consistent. Follow-up studies in Guatemala and Brazil showed few cognitive differences compared with normal birth weight infants; however, in a large Taiwan study, adolescents born term low birth weight had poorer academic achievement than those who were normal birth weight. Associations with behavior problems have also been reported in some studies but not others. The evidence to date suggests that term low birth weight infants are at risk for poor development but more information is needed on longer term outcomes. There have been few intervention studies aimed at improving the development of term low birth weight infants in developing countries. Evaluations of interventions feasible in resource-poor settings would contribute to reducing the developmental disadvantages associated with term low birth weight.....
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Keywords
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