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Publication Type
Journal Article
Author, Analytic
Thompson, Debbie S; Ferguson, TS; Samms-Vaughan, M; Wilks, RJ; Phillps, DI; Osmond, C; Forrester, Terrence E; Boyne, Michael
Author Affiliation, Ana.
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Article Title
Birth size is associated with nocturnal cortisol and glucose effectiveness in Afr-Caribbean adults
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Connective Phrase
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Journal Title
Clinical Endocrinology Oxford
Translated Title
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Reprint Status
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Date of Publication
2015
Volume ID
82
Issue ID
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Page(s)
352-358
Language
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Location/URL
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ISSN
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Notes
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Abstract
CONTEXT:Early-life factors (including intrauterine growth retardation) may influence the development of type 2 diabetes. We postulated that birth size is associated with cortisol levels, which itself could alter serum adipomyokines (i.e. adiponectin, IGF-I, myostatin) and glucose metabolism.DESIGN:An observational study with 60 Afro-Caribbean young adults from a birth cohort.MEASUREMENTS:Fasting blood was drawn for serum adiponectin, IGF-I and myostatin. A frequently sampled intravenous glucose tolerance test measured insulin sensitivity (SI), acute insulin response (AIRg), disposition index (DI) and glucose effectiveness (Sg). Body composition was assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Salivary cortisol was collected at home at 0800 and 2300 h. Sex-adjusted correlations were used to explore the relationships between birth size, cortisol and the metabolic variables.RESULTS:The participants were 55% male, mean age 231 05 years. Birth weight correlated positively with 2300-h cortisol (P = 004), although not after adjusting for gestational age. Gestational age was correlated with 2300 h cortisol (r = 038, P = 003), even after adjusting for birth weight (P = 002). 2300 h cortisol was not associated with adiponectin, IGF-I, myostatin, SI, AIRg or DI, but was negatively correlated with Sg (r = -030, P = 005) even after adjusting for birth and adult anthropometry. Adiponectin, IGF-I and myostatin were unrelated to glucose metabolism.CONCLUSIONS:Gestational age is associated with higher nocturnal cortisol, which in turn is associated with lower glucose effectiveness in adulthood. Higher glucose effectiveness could therefore be a compensatory mechanism to improve glucose uptake.....
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